Walking on Mt Taranaki – Maketawa Hut

28 01 2013

On Saturday a small group of SCANZ residents (incidentally all Australians) got together and did some bushwalking on Mt Taranaki. This was an important part of my project for SCANZ as the artwork I have made for the exhibition at Puki Ariki focuses on aerial maps of the mountain. I needed to have an understanding of the terrain and the vegetation that was ‘felt’, not just observed.

It was probably one of the most beautiful walks I have been on for a long time and one of the most physically challenging. As we walked from the Visitor’s Centre, we headed up to the three way turn off to the summit walk, then headed towards Maketawa Hut for lunch. The first part of the walk was walking uphill along a series of ridges, with beautiful views of the valley below and the coastline. Mt Taranaki however was hidden under cloud so we were not able to see the summit.

Around the mountain circuit - from Dept of Conservation website

Around the mountain circuit – from Dept of Conservation website

(From http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/taranaki/taranaki/around-the-mountain-circuit/)

After lunch we started to head down the track, through what I can only explain as an enchanted forest, with tree roots in many parts acting as natural steps. Once we arrived at the lowest point above sea level, we then went up and down some steep ridges and creeks. I found the landscape was both gentle in its beauty but difficult in terms of traversing. Along the way were a number of ladders up and down, giving a real sense of the undulating land formed by lava so long ago.

It was also wonderful to see elements of the imagery that I had collected of aerial views in the landscape. For example, these beautiful shapes in the image below.

Mt Taranaki

Mt Taranaki (from ‘Message to the mountain’ 2013)

Here is some information about the walk we did from holidays in New Zealand website (note we did the walk in the opposite direction):

Maketawa Hut Round Trip – 4 hours

This is for those who are fitter. Take the Ngatoro Track from below the Information Centre and turn left at the Maketawa Track Junction.

This takes you through more mossy forest, changing to nikau, cordylines and other flora and fauna. It takes about 2 hours to Maketawa Hut.

Walk through the hut to the outdoor deck for extensive views. Leaving the hut you walk up through alpine vegetation………….steps…steps… and more steps! Eventually you come out on the road just below the Translator Tower. From here you walk back down the road to the Camphouse.

One of the things I have learnt about mountains in Māori culture is that they are like people being male or female.  In an earlier post I discussed the story of how Taranaki came to reside in this region. Something else, I found very interesting is that in Māori culture, one should avoid touching the top of the head as it is the centre of all knowledge and memory. For this reason, it is not culturally appropriate to climb to the top of the summit and ‘stand’ on someone’s head. To learn some more about cultural protocols go to http://www.headspace.org.nz/maori-mental-health.htm.

A special thank you to Jo Tito for reviewing this post.

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Contemplating SCANZ2013 Themes – Revisiting Scalpland

24 01 2013

scalpanim

One of the things I have enjoyed most so far about the residency is the diversity of artists and art forms included in SCANZ. I have particularly loved the strong links between art, the environment and Indigenous knowledge. A powerful theme that has resonated is the connection between land and body – not being separate entities but coexisting and connected. This is strong in many Indigenous cultures and we have learnt so much over the last week, through the generosity of the Māori people involved in the residency and the people we have met through them, in particular Jo and Terri.

This relationship between land and body, especially articulated through performance and song has reminded my of one of my earliest works addressing land, body and identity – Scalpland.

This ‘poetic performance’ involved me clippering my hair off, using my head as a metaphor for land development and as a way of challenging feminine stereotypes of beauty and conformity by using the pseudo science of phrenology to highlight the perpetuation of assumptions derived from physical appearances. It was also a means to address a singular notion of history, one that was written onto the land by ‘clearing the surface’ and erasing the stories and histories that had gone before. Essentially this work was a response to the changes I witnessed returning to Brisbane after ten years away and the sense of loss I experienced.

When I returned in 1993, I did not recognise my old neighbourhood, the creek I played in as a child was now under a four lane highway, the bush where we made humpys (pretending we were Aborigines) was turned into retirement villas and my street was now a dangerous, major arterial road. It had become polluted and ugly, a place where traffic pollution was endemic and seemingly devoid of a community ‘heart’.

As I reflected on this work at SCANZ, I decided to do some research and came across some interesting historical images and maps. The picture below shows the site of Aspley State School, about 200 metres from home (on my street Maundrell Tce), before it became a school.

Aspley 1887 - site of Aspley State School

Aspley 1887 – site of Aspley State School

Here are some early maps, including an aerial map from 1946.

1925 Chermside and District

1925 Chermside and District

1937 Chermside and District

1937 Chermside and District

Chermside1946 Aerial

Chermside 1946 Aerial

In this image I have placed a current aerial map over the 1946 map to highlight the change, the close up follows after the next image.

Chermside-1946-Aerial_540-old-and-new

Chermside District 2013

Chermside District 2013

This shot is a much closer view of my block

Maundrell Tce 2013

Maundrell Tce 2013

One of the very interesting things I found out was that Gympie Road and Albany Creek Road were Aboriginal tracks. The creek where I played as a child was a meeting place and crossroad for potentially tens of thousands of years. Mr Wikipedia states:

Soon after Brisbane was declared a free settlement in 1842, people began exploring the lands north of Brisbane City. A northern route followed aboriginal tracks through what is now Kelvin Grove, Enoggera, Everton Hills, Albany Creek onto North Pine. This route is still known as “‘Old Northern Road'” and “‘Old North Road'” in places.
Another aboriginal track branching eastward from the Old Northern Road at the South Pine River crossed towards Little Cabbage Tree Creek and continued towards Downfall Creek. This track is now known as “Albany Creek Road” and “Gympie Road”. Albany Creek Road was known as “Chinaman Creek Road” before 1888.

Here is a map of where the tracks used to be, the line in the centre is Maundrell Tce (my street) with my house highlighted. Please note that Maundrell Terrace was NOT a track.

Ancient Tracks

Ancient Tracks

At this stage of my life, the idea of shaving my head is not very palatable (it takes too long to grow back), but I am really interested in exploring this piece on some level again, not sure how, but my time here at SCANZ has certainly reinvigorated my thinking about body/land/history/knowledge in an immediate way.

Check out these websites for more information:
http://queenslandplaces.com.au/node/39
http://www.chermsidedistrict.org.au/chermsidedistrict/default.asp

This post was also published on http://remotexmedia.wordpress.com





THATCamp CBR – Summary report

9 09 2010

THATCamp CBR Report

On 28-29 August, I participated in a very interesting event titled THATcamp Canberra, which was organised by Tim Sherratt (@wragge), Cath Styles (@cathstyles) and Mitchell Whitelaw (@mtchl) and hosted by University of Canberra.

This blog post is a summary of all the posts that were published on the mediakult blog about THATCamp, in an effort to keep the content together.

To explain, THATCamp Canberra was a user-generated ‘unconference’ on digital humanities. It was inspired by the original THATCamp, organised by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, and is one of a growing number of regional THATCamps springing up around the world. (‘THAT’ = ‘The Humanities And Technology’.)

The unconference model works on the idea that the participants generate the sessions, based on individual interests and research. In the lead up to THATCamp, participants blogged suggestions and then when we met on Saturday morning, the program was decided as a group, facilitated by Tim.

The sessions covered a broad range of topics including data visualisation to digital mapping to semantic web to augmented/digital space. Here is link to the THATCamp CBRprogram from Cath Styles Flickr page.

The sessions I attended were:

I missed the data visualisation session, but thanks to Michael Honey, this list of data viz links is a great resource of information about projects and tools focused on the visualisation of data.

As a general comment, the content of the sessions I attended was very rich, which was achieved by sharing experiences and tools in the spirit of collaboration. I have referred to some of the tools and projects in my reports on the workshops I attended. I went to THATcamp hoping to gain some practical skills and I found this, plus much more. I think the unconference model is a great way to focus on what participants want to explore, which was a big contributor to the success of the event.

THATCamp CBR – Semantic web session

The semantic web session was hugely popular, facilitated by Corey Wallis a software engineer who is involved in the development of additional services for the AusStage system as part of the Aus-e-Stage project.

I am particularly interested in the development of semantic web tools as an opportunity for LivingGreener to visualise data about sustainability issues. In addition to this as an artist and researcher I am starting to explore the use of semantic web and mapping tools as a way of developing creative work about family, identity. migration and place.

In short, Corey proposed a session that explored the potential use of semantic web technologies, such as the Resource Description Framework RDF, in supporting research and other projects in the humanities. Some initial questions to start the discussion include:

  • What are these types of technologies used for?
  • What kinds of activities in the humanities do they support?
  • What are the kinds of problems that we’ve used these technologies to solve?
  • What kinds of issues have been explored in using these types of technologies?
  • Sharing thoughts on success stories, war stories and other experiences with these types of technologies.

THATCamp CBR – Open linked data session

The main focus on this session was the access and use of PSI (Public Sector Information). Asa LeTourneau, from the Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) led this discussion.

This discussion focused on a range of issues including, developing APIs, data scaping from websites, and making data available and different institutions that have made their data available in different formats.

In many ways, this discussion ended up being more about the ‘who’ and the ‘what’ and I was hoping for more about the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ on a technical level. That said, I did learn that it is important to write good XML and to have strong URIs 🙂

There was a general comment that Australian government archives ahead of the game because of the ‘series system’ developed in the 1960s. This is a great opportunity for access and visualisation of open data on a global scale. There were also comments that there had been some very good work in this area in New Zealand.

THATCamp CBR – Digital mapping session

BootCamp: Putting the Digital Humanities in its place … what, why and how to map
Presented by Ian Johnson.

This session was an excellent practical introduction into digital mapping. Ian provided some very good information about the basics of GIS (Geographic Information System) and the types of tools and databases used to generate visualisations that intersected data with mapping.

To begin with, the group was taken through an overview of GIS, which I found particularly helpful as I have not had any formal training in this area and have a great interest in learning skills in mapping and GIS.

The presentation then focused on a number of projects that have used GIS technologies, for example: Macquarie map of Indigenous Australia 2007; South Seas Project; Digital Harlem 1915 – 1930 and Dictionary of Sydney.

Ian then provided a list of tools that are used for developing these projects – most significantly Time Maps and Heurist.

I am looking forward to learning much more about digital mapping and building technical skills with some of the tools mentioned in the blog post.

THATCamp CBR – Digital/Augmented space session

In this session, the focus was on how we can traverse physical space with digital tools, map our location and connect with others. There was a particular focus on who has been in the same location and what this could mean for sharing an experience of a space or idea of place. The discussion was led by Dr Chris Chesher, who initiated the discussion by sharing his interest in robots and augmented space.

This topic is close to my heart as it is related to my creative practice as well as my PhD research.

This discussion covered a lot of ground in terms of covering tools, conceptual issues, future possibilities and challenges. For this reason, the majority of this blog post is a list of dot points which are split into three sections – concepts/issues, tools and references. The best aspect of this session was that there was a lot of blue sky thinking about what was imagined, what was possible and what is already emerging. Thanks to @ellenforsyth for providing the initial list of discussion points.





THATCamp CBR – Digital mapping session

1 09 2010

BootCamp: Putting the Digital Humanities in its place … what, why and how to map
Presented by Ian Johnson.

This session was an excellent practical introduction into digital mapping. Ian provided some very good information about the basics of GIS (Geographic Information System) and the types of tools and databases used to generate visualisations that intersected data with mapping.

To begin with, the group was taken through an overview of GIS, which I found particularly helpful as I have not had any formal training in this area and have a great interest in learning skills in mapping and GIS.

The presentation then focused on a number of projects that have used GIS technologies, for example: Macquarie map of Indigenous Australia 2007; South Seas Project; Digital Harlem 1915 – 1930 and Dictionary of Sydney.

Ian then provided a list of tools that are used for developing these projects – most significantly Time Maps and Heurist.

I am looking forward to learning much more about digital mapping and building technical skills with some of the tools mentioned in the blog post.

Some dot points about  – digital mapping tools and technologies:

  • AusStage mapping service
  • what is spatial data? Vector – points lines, polygons – objects recorded with coordinates. Raster – aerial photos, satellite images, airborn scanner images, historical maps and plans.
  • Formats – CSV
  • shapefile – (old formats .shp .dbf .shx =ESRI) http://www.mapshaper.com/test/demo.html
  • KML (.kml, .kmx = Google Earth)
  • Databases – Access, MySql, ostgres, Oracle
  • TIF, GeoTiff = Remore sensed data
  • JPEG2000, MrSID, Zoomify = Tled images http://www.zoomify.com doesn’t need a image server
  • Projections, Datums, Coordinates – datum: point of reference and model of the earth; projecton: method of flattening earth on map; no such thing as a ‘correct’ projection, grid reference system (cartesian)
  • Lat and Long – GPS – uses WGS84 lat-long, no projection

Some projects worth mentioning:

  • Macquarie map of Indigenous Australia 2007
  • georeferencing – way of matching data
  • street address referencing
  • Geographical names register
  • Geonames
  • georeferencing 2 – usually raster arc gis
  • google earth and overlaying maps over time
  • PHALMS Parramatta Heritage Archeological Landscape Management Study
  • Digitising (Heurist)
  • South Seas Project
  • Digital Harlem 1915 – 1930
  • Dictionary of Sydney
  • CHGIS (Harvard, Griffith, Fudan, Russian Academy of Science)
  • A vision of Britain over time
  • Sydney Harbour landfill
  • BioMap – biofuel research in Europe
  • simile timeline MIT
  • Angkot fly through – real map with data vis laid on top

Some tools:

  • Field collection – i-pad looks very promising 3g model
  • smart phones – embedded GeoTags in images
  • FieldHelper Vsn 2 – GPS/camera mapping
  • abc innovation – using google earth and timeline
  • Sydney TimeMap – ARC SPIRT Grant (2000 – 2002)
  • TimeMap – useful tool – mobile version in development
  • Heurist Vsn 3 http://www.heuristscholar.org/heurist
  • http://acl.arts.usyd.edu.au/bootcamp/




THATCamp CBR – Digital/Augmented space session

1 09 2010

In this session, the focus was on how we can traverse physical space with digital tools, map our location and connect with others. There was a particular focus on who has been in the same location and what this could mean for sharing an experience of a space or idea of place. The discussion was led by Dr Chris Chesher, who initiated the discussion by sharing his interest in robots and augmented space.

This topic is close to my heart as it is related to my creative practice as well as my PhD research.

This discussion covered a lot of ground in terms of covering tools, conceptual issues, future possibilities and challenges. For this reason, the majority of this blog post is a list of dot points which are split into three sections – concepts/issues, tools and references. The best aspect of this session was that there was a lot of blue sky thinking about what was imagined, what was possible and what is already emerging. Thanks to @ellenforsyth for providing the initial list of discussion points.

Concepts/issues

There were so many ideas, concepts and issues that emerged from this discussion, that I thought it prudent to try and only list some of the main themes:

  • how robots inhabit space – robots moved from science fiction to reality
  • gps – networked connections which inform about the space
  • spaces which have embedded information systems
  • what are the regulatory questions?
  • using mobile devices to record knowledge, stories in situ and feed it back for others
  • problems have changed – the technology gets smaller – perhaps the tablets are the solution – better image size – can make available in museum (Puke Ariki doing this now or soon)
  • two sides – using location based information to access received wisdom (museums, libraries, archives) but the other side of the community generated knowledge – accumulation of wisdom about specific locations – mention of 4square as a way of getting local recommendations
  • looking at memory – it may be the experience of the place, not the place itself – the personal stories, example of visiting the site of the former World Trade centre and the stories around
  • issue of following people on twitter who may over tweet their location – are we interested?
  • question about how to represent “my space” in a physical and an online way – how can an indiviual represent their physical space
  • second life mapping? dashboard with all spaces represented – could have a physical representation at some point, virtualising
  • artists working with gps locating combining in physical space – eg. Nigel Helyer
  • need for a truly topological architecture which can change, be exploratory, but can leave a trace others can interact with
  • AR – example which uses face recognition technology – as a navigation and access tool – using separate feeds for interaction,
  • is there an intiutive, pure way of leaving the trace in the environment?
  • the audio moving as you move through physical space – wanting diversity
  • who funds the staged experiences? collaborations? scalable? interlinking? example of staged experience cycling through inner west Sydney looking at galleries – other wise would not explore
  • push space – potential for marketing, but also possible for heritage and art discovery
  • example of Blutooth enabled signs in Adelaide for a band – song sample played
  • rfid – can slide tags in everywhere – no way of judging/evaluating them – perhap a solution is to be able to put filters on?
  • is there a market for the cultural sector to be a collective filter for people to opt to – as a collaboration rather than organisation by organisation?
  • idea that aggregators with crop up in the future – subscription option – also location filtering?
  • there could be a place for local aggregated information for discovery
    multiple view points helpful for many areas/locations
  • are the technologies providing the connections or enabling the connections
    broadening connections and also ultra local possibilities
  • different platforms with different norms about who you will have relationships with – differences with facebook, twitter, delicious…
  • need to keep in mind W3C standards and full accessibility – plus multilingual options? also social inclusion is very important – eg. iPhone ad showing people using their phone to sign
  • example of developing countries doing really interesting things with mobile phones, mobile phones as leap frogging technologies
  • example of using mobile phone technologies in refugee camps, and in transitioning to settlement
  • mobile phone as private space – this feeds into the notion of augmented space and personal/public have become blurred with the use of technology
  • banking transfer system in one African country based on mobile phone
  • are we already augmenting reality – by sharing things in different ways?
  • phones in West Bank provide a way around the changing boundaries – as can reroute people about the changes, adn map for boarder crossing pathways with real time updates
  • parking police mobile app – you know where they have been…
  • rfid tracking of cattle and sheep – genetics and feeding
  • stories from the US passing laws the prevent employees being micro chipped

Tools

  • readcloud – for ipad – people in a book club can comment, add images, where they are, twitter feeds, within the application of the book club, bringing together online and physical
  • soundcloud – similar with comments on the audio track, or kindle ap with high light within text to share possible sections of reading
  • Parramatta Library/Heritage centre will loan devices for accessing the walking tours
  • Museum which created a story ending at at secret room at the museum, online sources from Nina Simon blog
  • Tools for geocaching audio – blockchalk.com, graphito (iphone app)
  • What about qr codes, qr queries? has their time passed? Issues of adding qr codes to buildings – who owns the plaque, can the code fit? Not all phones can read qr codes
  • new forms of fiction – King Park app finding your way to particular points – you are part of the story – also a version for Sydney Park
  • judas goat – feral goat tracking device – way of doing feral goat reduction
  • mesh technology could tie in with local applications as well
  • in France – Free – two boxes – networked foneros (?) works feeding “extra” maps.fon.com bandwidth into shared area – sharing your own bandwidth
  • 4square – using gps to recognise where you might be, and can share information with friends or tweet or post tips for anyone to read – game mechanic “mayor” of place
  • Parramatta Heritage i-phone app for Governor Macquarie heritage walking tour, walking the past in Parramatta through the built up environment
  • mesh mobile phones – mobile phones reaching the tower through other mobile phones – for emergency phone towers

References

  • Cyberspace first steps (text title) this book was refered to, circa 1999, but I have not yet found it in a collection)




Transmission Lines 1955 – 1974

20 07 2008

Transmission Lines 1955 – 1974 is a project by Linda Carroli. It documents her father’s working life as a rigger and linesman with the Electric Power Transmission and its Italian parent company. He kept a photographic record of his working life and the photographs featured in this map are his personal photographs from various transmission line projects around Australia and Italy in the period 1955 to 1974. However, he commenced work in Italy in 1954 and remained working with EPT until 1975.





del.icio.us + MindMap

2 02 2008

This is cool! It has been around for a while, but as I am new to Freemind this is a novelty. Delicious Mind puts your del.icio.us bookmarks into a mind map format.